Sugarloaf

The Port Hills are part of the extinct Lyttelton volcano. The highest peak of the Port Hills is called Sugarloaf and has various broadcasting aerials on the top. We walked up from the Sign of the Kiwi. It was cold, but sunny.

There were birds (various finches and swallows), but there weren’t many insects – maybe it was too cold? We did see a very patterned caterpillar though. Wonder what species it is?

The trig at the top of Sugarloaf
The trig at the top of Sugarloaf
Track markers
Track markers
Lichens covering rocks
Lichens and moss covering rocks
Rock face that has fractured
Rock face that has fractured
Something made these holes in the bank
Something made these holes in the bank – native bees?
Drainage channels across the track
Drainage channels across the track
Eroding hill side
Eroding hill side
Sugarloaf tower
Sugarloaf tower
Governors Bay harbour
Governors Bay Harbour
Entrance to Lyttelton Harbour
Entrance to Lyttelton Harbour
Patterned caterpillar
Patterned caterpillar
Transmitter and trig
Transmitter and trig

Chemistry

A rather interesting reaction that you can do is to add vinegar to baking soda. It should fizz! The fizzing is carbon dioxide being produced.

Adding vinegar
Fizzing
More fizzing
A different volcano design
A fancier volcano design
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Another reaction involves swirly patterns in milk. What you need is a mint tic tac. Pour some milk into a large plate. Put some food colouring in, drop the tic tac in, and it should fizz. If you drop some detergent into the milk it will swirl.

Milk and detergent and food colouring
More coloured milk
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